Continuing with the sleeve-theme, this time I put together all kinds of pleated sleeves. They are beautiful, but unfortunately also high maintenance: every time you wash the garment, you’ll need to press all the pleats again. You might find my pleating-tutorial useful when drafting these. There’s the half-scale sleeve pattern pdf you can download from the side-panel, although it was more useful for the previous batch of sleeves. Sleeve with a central box-pleat Starting with the most simple one of the group. There’s just one box-pleat to be added in the middle of the sleeve. So draw a line where you want the pleat to be. Cut the sleeve in two pieces and add the pleat normally. You get the right shape if you fold the box-pleat before cutting the pattern. (=cut the pattern folded) Vertically pleated sleeve From the previous sleeve, it’s easy to get to this one. It…

People often ask me to recommend some pattern making books, so I decided to write a few introductions. Well, there are already these two articles about the Pattern Magic-series, which I continue to recommend, but now it’s time to introduce something more basic. I chose some books which I want to write about. The perfect book to start with, is Metric Pattern Cutting for Women’s Wear by Winifred Aldrich, which has been around since 1975 and by now has reached its 6th edition. It’s been published by John Wiley & Sons. What’s it about The book has been written for fashion-students, who are beginners in pattern making, but it’s also useful as a reference book for freelance-designers. It teaches the basics of pattern making, starting from the basic blocks of all the various garment types: skirt,trouser, bodice, jacket, coat.. And how to transform them into various different styles. So basically…

It’s time to introduce another talented person many of you are probably already following on Instagram. Does Tatiana Ballos sound familiar to you? She’s an amazing patternmaker, seamstress and designer all in one. Tatiana Ballos was born and grew up in Moscow, Russia, but has been living in Vancouver, Canada since a long time ago. She started sewing for dolls when she was little and later went on to sew clothes for herself and for her friends. When time came to choose career between designer/patternmaker and architect, fashion seemed more familiar so she got her diploma in design and patternmaking. Tatiana started her career in an atelier as a young patternmaker, and it was there that she felt the need to improve her sewing skills: She didn’t feel comfortable telling much older and experienced seamstresses how the garments should be made. So she started observing these masters and then practicing…

I recently posted this origami petal variation to the bamboo-bodice on Instagram. Now I’ll quickly explain how it was done, because I have a feeling that the origami designs are among your favorites. First of all, I separated an area in the middle of the bodice front, so that the origami-element was only going to cover that part. These stylelines conveniently absorb the darts, too. I already drew the bamboo-lines there, as I wanted to avoid having to copy the pieces. Then I just cut away the sides. They are symmetrical, so I only needed to keep one of them. I trimmed the area around the dart-point a bit, making it more round. The idea to this variation came from the braided designs of TR Masters’ challenge. It’s very much related to the origami petals. If you didn’t read the previous post yet, I suggest you do it now to…