I recently posted this origami petal variation to the bamboo-bodice on Instagram. Now I’ll quickly explain how it was done, because I have a feeling that the origami designs are among your favorites. First of all, I separated an area in the middle of the bodice front, so that the origami-element was only going to cover that part. These stylelines conveniently absorb the darts, too. I already drew the bamboo-lines there, as I wanted to avoid having to copy the pieces. Then I just cut away the sides. They are symmetrical, so I only needed to keep one of them. I trimmed the area around the dart-point a bit, making it more round. The idea to this variation came from the braided designs of TR Masters’ challenge. It’s very much related to the origami petals. If you didn’t read the previous post yet, I suggest you do it now to…

It’s been months since the last time I wrote here. The summer was simply too busy. I was trying to juggle various projects all at once, both work and study. Maybe you noticed I wasn’t too active on Instagram, either. I did finish the designs I got from different designers, although within a much longer period than I initially had planned. In any case, that was an inspiring experience and it was nice to make something different. Here are a couple of those pieces. Then I went on a well-deserved vacation at my parents’ place in Finland for almost a month. Italian summer is too hot for me, so Finland is a great choice. I actually brought my ½-scale dressform with me on vacation! You see, I had to work on the 2018 TR Masters’ Challenge -tasks. The deadline is at the end of August. The last task is almost…

So I finished the TR Masterclass, then what? The great thing about this class is that after you’ve finished, you get to participate every year in the Masters’ Challenge…

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In my very first blog-post I said I was going to write about Shingo Sato’s TR Masterclass later. That was almost 4 months ago… So I believe it’s time! In case you’re not familiar with Shingo Sato, he’s a Japanese designer and patternmaking-instructor who travels around the world to teach his method called TR cutting (=transformational reconstruction) at different fashion schools. You can see the list of the schools at his Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/trcuttingschool/ TR Masterclass In case a workshop is not an option for you, Shingo Sato also organizes online classes. Among those, there’s the Masterclass, which is kind of a summary of everything. During 5 months it goes from the basic techniques to the more advanced ones. You’ll learn all kinds of cool things. I checked the latest information and it says there are 40 topics. So how does an online course work? You’ll learn from videos you can…

Continuing with the same theme as last time, the panel-construction. Now I’ll show you some other shapes you can create by using this technique. If you’re looking for ways to make sculptural garments, this could be one option. Take a look at this skirt I made in ½-scale: And here’s another skirt: A neckline: How? Besides the outcomes, also the patterns look quite amazing. I gathered a few examples here. The starting point is always the same, dividing the pattern into sections (=panels). Check out my last post for the more simple constructions http://www.theshapesoffabric.com/2018/04/22/lets-draft-some-panel-skirts/ So just decide the amount of panels first, and divide your pattern-piece accordingly. Sleeve Let’s start from this sculptural sleeve I made last year. The starting point is a basic sleeve-pattern with very little ease. I divided the area into 8 panels. There’s a seam between each panel, right? Every time there’s a seam, it…