Summer is quickly approaching here in Milan, and that inspired me to write about skirts. Not just any skirts of course, but panel-skirts. I want to include more wearable designs in my blog and this is a perfect opportunity! There are two ways to draft the pattern. You can either draw directly one panel, which is then repeated, or you can start from the basic skirt pattern and draft the panels on top of it. In my opinion, the first case works best when it comes to flared skirts and the second one is for the more slim-fitting designs. Single panel -approach First you need to decide how many panels your skirt should have. Choose as many as you like -and are willing to sew. In my example, there are 6 panels. The measurements needed are: waist hip the distance between waist and hip skirt-length You might want to…

So, as promised, here’s another post on pleats. They are so versatile that I wanted to introduce a couple of other variations: the pleated stripes and pleats across pleats. Because why make things too simple, right? Both techniques are easier if you already read the first post http://www.theshapesoffabric.com/2018/03/17/speaking-of-pleats/ Pleated stripes This is a prime example of my bad habit of shattering one pattern piece into several smaller pieces. The skirt represents this technique, but the main piece will be a bodice, as it’s a bit easier. So, take your basic bodice pattern and divide it in two, absorbing the dart(s). After separating the two pieces, draw lines where you want the pleats to be. These will also be stripes, so decide how wide you want them. Number each, and add the color-codes. To get stripes, this piece is made with two different colors of fabric, in my case black (B)…

Adding a few pictures right away so the title will make more sense. These are examples of surface patterns I’ve made: As you can see, it’s all about different folds and contours of the pattern pieces that create surface patterns to the garment. You can play with both negative and positive spaces. You’ll get most out of this technique by using two different colors, but you might also want to try different textures. It’s a good idea to choose a crisp fabric that is easy to press. Initially I got the idea to these from Ruth Singer’s book Fabric Manipulation. There’s a chapter about ribbon folding, so I just developed the technique a bit further to apply it to a whole bodice. I want to show you two different methods, so this will be a tutorial divided into two parts. I’ll try to post the second part soon after this…

Ready for some geometry? Of course I wasn’t going to skip my favorite, the polyhedrons! This is a technique you can find in Pattern Magic 3. I don’t know about you, but I’ve never really liked mathematics, so it took me some time to understand how to calculate the pattern. I’ve put together a tutorial, trying to explain everything in the easiest way possible, using lots of drawings. Never mind the terms, not sure I used the official ones! In addition to the usual tools ruler and pencil, you’ll also need a compass. The pattern 1. Let’s get started by drawing any kind of polygon, regular or irregular, with as many angles as you want. Mine is an irregular triangle. Then you’ll choose where you want the highest point to be (see the orange dot). 2. Draw lines from each angle to the central dot. As a result, you…