The first round of this years TR masters’ challenge finished at the end of August. This is the first time the Challenge has been divided in two parts. We had a month to complete 5 tasks and we’ll continue in December. Total of 22 TR masters from around the world managed to pass the first round and I’m lucky to be among them. This is my third time to participate. The reason why it’s called a challenge, is that we don’t really get instructions on how to draft the patterns. So here’s how a task looks like. The picture is from TR cutting school’s FB page. As you can see, it’s a bunch of pictures of the outcome from different angles. The tasks are based on the skills you learn during the TR Masterclass. For example, this time it was origami-techniques. Mission 1 Let’s have a closer look at the…

I recently received a request to make a bamboo-bodice -tutorial. That fits perfectly in my latest theme: TR-cutting. As I’ve said before, you can find a bamboo-bodice also in the Pattern Magic -series, but I prefer Shingo Sato’s version. Bamboo-bodice is an origami-technique that you can develop further into all kinds of different designs. In my previous post I added many pictures of origami-designs I’ve made if you want some inspiration. http://www.theshapesoffabric.com/2018/06/04/after-masterclass/ As usual, it takes some time to prepare the pattern. More folds you want, more time it’ll take. I was actually going to add a few videos to this tutorial, too, but in the end the files were too large for my blog! So you get a ton of pictures instead. Anyways, this is the resulting bodice. Bamboo-bodice pattern The starting point is a basic bodice like this. You’ll need the whole front-piece. It’ll be easier to…

So I finished the TR Masterclass, then what? The great thing about this class is that after you’ve finished, you get to participate every year in the Masters’ Challenge…

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Have you ever heard about smocking? Cushion-covers might be the first thing that comes to your mind. But I can assure you that it looks great on garments, too. Just to be clear, there are different kinds of smocking: the English and the North American (lattice) smocking. I’ve also seen the term Canadian smocking, which is probably the same thing. Well, I’m talking about the North American smocking here. It differs quite a lot from the English one. Smocking is all about gathering the fabric by hand stitches, following a grid, and this produces different shapes. You work on the wrong side of the fabric. It’s definitely one of my favorite fabric-manipulation -techniques! I’ll first explain the basics and then it’s time to reveal the rose-sleeve -tutorial. Basics This is a tutorial I have previously published on Instagram, but I thought I could explain the passages better here at…

Summer is quickly approaching here in Milan, and that inspired me to write about skirts. Not just any skirts of course, but panel-skirts. I want to include more wearable designs in my blog and this is a perfect opportunity! There are two ways to draft the pattern. You can either draw directly one panel, which is then repeated, or you can start from the basic skirt pattern and draft the panels on top of it. In my opinion, the first case works best when it comes to flared skirts and the second one is for the more slim-fitting designs. Single panel -approach First you need to decide how many panels your skirt should have. Choose as many as you like -and are willing to sew. In my example, there are 6 panels. The measurements needed are: waist hip the distance between waist and hip skirt-length You might want to…