There haven’t been any sewing projects on my blog for quite a while. So I say we fix that right away. This project evolved from my curiosity towards zero waste fashion. And from a need of an apron I had while working with fluffy fabrics. An apron seemed like a perfect first approach to zero waste patterns. I don’t know if you’re familiar with zero waste fashion, but the basic idea is that you utilize the whole fabric without throwing any piece of it away. This causes some challenges in the pattern design, because the various pattern pieces need to fit together perfectly, like pieces of puzzle. This being my very first attempt, the pieces are really plain rectangles and triangles. I threw in some folds and pleats to make the design a bit more interesting. Materials and the pattern To make this apron, you’ll need a 150cm x 50cm…

Today I want to talk to you about a book called Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics by Julie Cole. Maybe you’ve already heard of it.? It was published in 2016 by Fairchild Books. I actually got this book over a year ago as a reference for knitwear patterns, but I’ve been so good at avoiding knitwear, that I only recently picked it up from the bookshelf and started reading. It was more in the spirit of conquering new ground. The result: now I’m really tempted to experiment with knits! It’s such an amazing book! So of course I decided to write a blog post about it, too. It’s been a while since I wrote a review anyways. General notions Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics is a beautiful, hardcover, spiral bound book. It has a total of 416 pages with hundreds of pictures and illustrations. I think it’s a complete package;…

It’s already mid-March. Remember how I wrote about participating in the Make Nine -challenge this year? Well, it’s about time I do something about it, right? Ok, I did make a hat, but that was like the easiest task of the bunch. So here comes the second piece! A dress. And like I promised, I’m going to show you the process, concentrating especially on the pattern making -part of it, modifying the basic bodice pattern. Basically you’ll see how to copy a dress to your own measurements, having just a picture of it. Maybe making some slight changes to the shape. If you like the style of this dress, you can follow the instructions and make your own! Analyzing the dress So this is the dress in question. The first thing I do, is analyze different parts of the garment. You can see some of my considerations in the picture.…

Here’s a tutorial for those of you that are interested in learning to draft their own patterns. As you might already know, the starting point of drafting patterns is the basic pattern block. You should create the basic pattern for each type of garment using your own measurements: skirt, pants, bodice/dress with darts, bodice/dress without darts, etc. Afterwards you can modify that pattern to make all sorts of different garments. I’ll show you how to draft the basic skirt pattern as skirt is the most easiest piece of clothing to start with. Later I’ll write some posts about how to turn that pattern into different types of skirts. In the meantime, take a look at my panel skirt -tutorial. Measurements To draft this pattern, you’ll need these measurements: waisthipdistance from waist to hiptotal length of the skirt Divide the first two measurements (waist and hip circumference) in half. Then add…